The area known as present-day La Vernia was first inhabited by indigenous American Indians of the Coahuiltecan speaking peoples of Texas and subsequently by nomadic bands of Apache and Comanche who migrated to Texas in the 17th century. One of the earliest land grants made was to Erastus “Deaf” Smith, also known as Deaf Smith. Deaf Smith married Guadalupe Ruiz Durán, a Mexican citizen who was descended from one of the original Tejano or Spanish Texas families;[3] and as such, received a land grant from the Mexican government on the Cibolo River, north of present-day La Vernia in 1825. This area remained primarily unsettled by Europeans until 1837, when veterans from the recent wars of Independence from Mexico began to arrive.

W. R. Wiseman of Mississippi, who organized a Presbyterian church at the site around 1851, is said to have named the place Live Oak Grove.[4] Although, in 1853 William Claiborne Rector was the postmaster at the local post office and during this time the town was still called Post Oak.[5]

The town’s current name came from the local Spanish vernacular for “green oaks”, or “La Vernia“. Hence, the Brahan Masonic lodge was first established at “La Vernia” in 1859. The building also served as a school and church.[6]

German and Polish immigration brought the population to 110 by 1885. The community was now served by three churches, a steam gristmill, and a cotton gin. H. Suhre was the owner of the general store.[4] During this time the major crop grown was corn, being it was so universally useful. Cotton also proved to be an important commodity. In present day La Vernia, corn and cotton are still major crops.

By 1915, the town operated two gins, a bank, four churches, a pottery plant, a brick works, and supported a population of 500. In 1947, seventeen businesses would provide much attraction, to more and more people, over the coming years. In 1965, population had increased to 700 residents and twenty-five businesses.[4]

The community incorporated around 1966, and in 1990, had a population of 639 and thirty-six businesses and a gas station called “Tommy’s Exxon”, owned by Bonnie and Thomas Kravitz, and assisted by their son, Samuel Kravitz. La Vernia experienced out-migration and a subsequent population drop, due to the lure of the big city atmosphere and larger job markets available in neighboring San Antonio, Floresville and Canyon Lake. Many larger towns were getting very popular about this time.

In 2000, La Vernia had 136 businesses and a population of 931. The census[1] of 2005 La Vernia had a population of 1,087 of people. In 2010 a new shopping area was built just west of town on Hwy 87, including a new H-E-B grocery store and gas station. A longtime grocer, Baumann’s Grocery store, closed at the time HEB opened.

  • From 1890 to 1896
  • Through the 1763
  • On March 20, 1764
  • In 1890, La Vernia had a population of 200. Construction of the San Antonio and Gulf Railroad across the area in 1893 brought the population to 343 by 1900. A two-teacher school was in operation by 1896. Classes grew to be so large, that they had to move out of the Masonic lodge. The enrollment had grown to sixty-six children.[4]

  • Following France’s loss in the French and Indian War, through the 1763 Treaty of Paris they ceded control of the land to the British. Colonial settlement was limited by the Crown to lands east of the Appalachians, in order to try to end encroachment on Native American lands. The territory of Vermont was divided nearly in half in a jagged line running from Fort William Henry in Lake George diagonally north-eastward to Lake Memphremagog. With the end of the war, new settlers arrived in Vermont. Ultimately, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and New York all claimed this frontier area.

  • On March 20, 1764, King George III established the boundary between New Hampshire and New York along the west bank of the Connecticut River, north of Massachusetts, and south of 45 degrees north latitude. In 1770, Ethan Allen, his brothers Ira and Levi, and Seth Warner, recruited an informal militia known as the Green Mountain Boys to protect the interests of the original New Hampshire settlers against newcomers from New York.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article La Vernia, TX, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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